Resources tagged: corruption


Gas flaring impacts – Nigeria

Author: Peter Roderick, Climate Justice Programme
Date: June 2005
Categories: Critical accounts of negative impacts, Flaring

Executive Summary More gas is flared in Nigeria than anywhere else in the world. Estimates are notoriously unreliable, but roughly 2.5 billion cubic feet of gas associated with crude oil is wasted in this way everyday. This is equivalent to 40% of all Africa’s natural gas consumption in 2001, while the annual financial loss to Nigeria is about US$ 2.5 billion. The flares have contributed more greenhouse gases than all of sub-Saharan Africa combined. And the flares contain a cocktail of toxins that affect the health and livelihoods of local communities, exposing Niger Delta residents to an increased risk of premature deaths, child respiratory illnesses, asthma and cancer. This is


Corruption in oil – US regulator relations

Author: Suzanne Goldenberg, The Guardian
Date: Thursday September 11 2008
Categories: Critical accounts of negative impacts, Governance, News Articles

Government officials in charge of collecting royalties from oil companies accepted ski holidays and other gifts from the firms they were meant to be regulating, as well as using cocaine and having sex with industry executives, according to an official report released yesterday. The inspector general’s investigation found a “culture of substance abuse and promiscuity” operating at the mineral management service (MMS), the government agency charged with regulating oil companies. The investigation focused on the royalties-in-kind programme which allows oil companies to pay royalties to the federal government in oil and gas rather than cash. It is one of the government’s biggest sources of revenue outside of taxes, bringing in


Human Rights Impact of Mismanagement Oil Revenues

Author: Human Rights Watch
Date: January 2007
Categories: Critical accounts of negative impacts, Governance, Reports

Nigeria has produced several hundred billion dollars worth of oil since independence in 1960, but ordinary Nigerians have derived appallingly little benefit from all of that wealth. This situation exists primarily because successive governments, both military and civilian, have stolen or misused much of Nigeria’s tremendous oil wealth. The head of Nigeria’s Economic and Financial Crimes Commission has stated that the country lost as much as $380 billion to corruption and waste between 1960 and 1999, the year Nigeria’s current government came to power. The human rights impact of those losses has been profound, as funds that government could have spent on basic health care and primary education for Nigeria’s